A Nurse’s Guide For Prescribing The Possessive Apostrophe

Nursing

Or if this should be entitled “A Nurses’ Guide… ?” This can be among the greatest and many serious questions every doctor in the usa is battling with today. Where, when, and how can we correctly make use of the possessive apostrophe? To get our healthcare system back in line, people need to understand the solution. And, unlike a thought that is gaining recognition in the usa and England, the possessive apostrophe isn’t archaic or quaint. Every single day I view it used and mistreated in a lot of ways by our students. Therefore, we wanted a user friendly help guide to get all of us to the same page. Also it does not help our righteous cause any that some medical publications, organizations, and websites will also be sporadic within their utilisation of the possessive apostrophe.

So, with no prolonged pause, here’s my little guide for that problematic possessive:

Singular Examples

a. The nurse’s scrubs are colorful. (and therefore among the nurses has colorful scrubs)

b. That nurse’s scrubs are colorful.

c. They’re Nurse Jane’s colorful scrubs.

d. These colorful scrubs fit in with Nurse Jane.

e. They’re Nurse Carlos’ colorful scrubs.

f. Nurse Jane’s friend’s colorful scrubs. (correct, but awkward, so re-write it one other way)

Plural Examples

a. The nurses’ scrubs are colorful. (every nurse inside a group has colorful scrubs)

b. Individuals nurses’ scrubs are colorful.

c. All of the nurses’ scrubs are colorful.

d. Every nurse has colorful scrubs.

Within the above examples, all the nurses being discussed have colorful scrubs.

Non-Apostrophe Examples

a. The nurses usually arrive here at 6:45 each morning. (meaning all of the nurses)

b. The nurse usually will get at 6:45 each morning. (meaning among the nurses)

c. Nurse Jane usually will get at 6:45 each morning.

d. Both nurses usually arrive here at 6:45 each morning.

e. Every nurse will get at 6:45 each morning.

f. Every nurse for the reason that unit will get at 6:45 each morning.

Organization Name Examples

a. St. George’s Nurses Association

b. St. George’s Nurses’ Association

c. St. Georges Nurses Association

d. St. George’s Nurses’ Association’s E-newsletter

e. St. George’s Nurses’ Association E-newsletter

f. St. Georges Hospital

g. St. George’s Hospital’s nurses are here to assist. (correct, but awkward, so re-write it one other way)

Within the above examples, the position from the apostrophe reaches the discretion from the organization itself. Whichever way they decide to display and employ their name, that’s the approach we take to should write it.

More Organization Name Examples

a. Worldwide Nurses’ Day (for those nurses)

b. Worldwide Nurse’s Day (for just one nurse, as with A Birthday)

c. Worldwide Nurses Day (today, the apostrophe is generally overlooked)

d. The Worldwide Nurses’ Day’s celebration ceremony will occur within the conference room. (awkward, re-write)

e. The Worldwide Nurses’ Day celebration ceremony will occur within the conference room.

f. The net address might then become: InternationalNursesDay (a hypothetical example)

Within the above examples, the position from the apostrophe can also be in the discretion from the founding organization itself.

Conclusion

Whenever we write there’s an obligation to the readers to create as clearly as you possibly can. And taking advantage of the possessive apostrophe in the right way goes a lengthy means by helping our readers know very well what we are attempting to tell them. Understanding where, when, and the way to correctly make use of the possessive apostrophe isn’t difficult. And when its use creates an uncomfortable sentence, the sentence can easily be re-designed in an easy method. Don’t allow the apostrophe critics convince you otherwise. Within the real life we authors must show respect for the subject material and our readers. While using possessive apostrophe in the right way can help your potential customers fix the earth’s healthcare problems making the world a much better home in. If you notice anything here that requires more explanation, or must be remedied, tell me. Lengthy live the possessive apostrophe!